Tag Archives: animals

Hare means one who was fleet of foot

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Hare means one who was fleet of foot

The surname of HARE was a nickname ‘one who was fleet of foot’.  The name was derived from the old English word ‘hyr’ and is familiar to East Cornwall. Surnames having a derivation from nicknames form the broadest and most miscellaneous class of surnames, encompassing many different types of origin. The most typical classes refer adjectivally to the general physical aspect of the person concerned, or to his character. Many nicknames refer to a man’s size or height, while others make reference to a favoured article of clothing or style of dress. Many surnames derived from the names of animals and birds. In the Middle Ages ideas were held about the characters of other living creatures, based on observation, and these associations were reflected and reinforced by large bodies of folk tales featuring animals behaving as humans.Early records of the name mention Hugh le Hare, 1273, County Oxford. Willelmus Hare of Yorkshire, was listed in the Yorkshire Poll Tax of 1379.
Following the crusades in Europe in the 11th, 12th and 13th centuries, a need was felt for a family name to replace the one given at birth, or in addition to it. This was recognized by those of noble birth, and particularly by those who went on the Crusades, as it added prestige and practical advantage to their status. At first the coat of arms was a practical matter which served a function
of the battlefield and in tournaments. With his helmet covering his face, and armour encasing the knight from head to foot, the only means of identification for his followers, was the insignia painted on his shield, and embroidered on his surcoat, the draped and flowing garment worn over the armour. The associated arms are recorded in Sir Bernard Burkes General Armory. Ulster King of Arms in 1884. In many parts of central and western Europe, hereditary surnames began to
become fixed at around the 12th century, and have developed and changed slowly over the years. As society became more complex, and such matters as the management of tenure, and in particular the collection of taxes were delegated to special functionaries, it became imperative to distinguish a more complex system of nomenclature to differentiate one individual from another.

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Blunt means the blond and fair haired person

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The surname BLUNT was  a nickname ‘the blond and  fair haired person’ the name was  derived from the Old French word ‘blonde’, and  was  brought into England in the wake  of the Norman Invasion of 1066.  The name is also  spelt  BLUNK, BLUNTE and  BLOUNTE. Surnames having  a derivation from nicknames form the broadest and  most  miscellaneous class of surnames, encompassing many  different  types of origin. The most  typical classes refer adjectivally to the general physical aspect of the person concerned, or to his character. Many nicknames refer to a man’s size  or height, while others make reference to a favoured article  of clothing  or style of dress. Many surnames derived from the names of animals and  birds.  In the Middle Ages  ideas were  held about the characters of other  living creatures, based on observation, and  these associations were reflected and  reinforced by large  bodies of folk tales featuring animals behaving as humans. The acquisition of surnames in Europe and  England, during the last eight hundred years has been affected by many  factors, including  social  class and  social  structure, naming practices in cultures and  traditions. On the whole  the richer and  more  powerful classes tended to acquire surnames earlier  than  the working class or the poor,  while surnames were  quicker  to catch on in urban areas than  in more  sparsely populated rural areas. The bulk of surnames in England were  formed  in the 13th and  14th centuries. The process started earlier  and  continued in place names into the 19th century, but the norm is that in the 11th century people did not have surnames, whereas by the 15th century they did. Early records of the name mention Melodia  le Blount, 1273  London. Ascelina le Blunt was  documented in County  Norfolk in the year  1274.  Marareta le Blound  of Yorkshire  was  listed in the Yorkshire  Poll Tax of 1379.  George Blount and  Isabell  Tinker were married at St. George’s, Hanover Square, London  in 1767.  Edmund White and  Ann Blunt, 1786. The associated arms are  recorded in Sir Bernard Burkes General Armory. Ulster  King of Arms in 1884.  The lion depicted in the crest is the noblest of all wild beasts which is made to be the emblem of strength and  valour,  and  is on that account the most  frequently borne in Coat-Armour.

ARMS – Barry nebulee of six or and  sable

CREST – A lion passant gules crowned or

MOTTO – LUX TUA VIA MEA Thy light is my way